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A grill in the table center is surrounded by meats, condiments, and beers.
Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai B.B.Q. in Queens.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

The Best All-You-Can-Eat Restaurants in New York City

Korean barbecue, Sri Lankan buffet, Chinese hot pot, and other great deals

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Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai B.B.Q. in Queens.
| Caroline Shin/Eater NY

A decade ago the city’s dining landscape was littered with all-you-can-eat places. Usually couched as buffets, they allowed patrons to line up and pass by a dozen or more heated tubs, piling their plates with food to teetering heights, after which they’d seek out a table and begin shoveling. Then they’d do the same thing again.

But COVID threw a wrench in the AYCE system. Buffets, even with sneeze guards, were deemed unsanitary. South Asian restaurants especially suffered, and famous establishments like Jackson Diner, Utsav, and Haandi dismantled their luscious displays of food.

Now the old buffets are returning, joined by Korean barbecue restaurants that offer unlimited servings of cook-it-yourself meats; Chinese hot pots that renew your supply of broth; and Brazilian churrascarias, where you grab gauchos as they pass with skewers of charcoal-grilled meats until you can eat no more.

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The Meat Bros

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The Meat Bros is like a modern factory of Korean barbecue that costs $39.99 for two hours. Their purpose is to get you to barbecue at your table as much meat as possible. Meats are requisitioned on a form with 25 varieties, including marinated pork collar and small spicy octopus. And banchan are included in one all-in price.

A rooms filled with tables with vents hanging down over each table.
The futuristic interior of Meat Bros.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet

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Located in the Grand Concourse neighborhood, Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet really means “supreme” — the buffet runs to sushi, steak, seafood simply cooked, and Chinese food, a beguiling combination if there ever were one. Prices are $12 for lunch to $18 for dinner and cheaper options for kids under $12.

Several pieces of nigiri sushi featuring shrimp, salmon, and tuna.
Sushi is part of the buffet experience at Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet.
Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet

Witch Topokki

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This all-you-can-eat in Flushing, Queens, specializes in the Korean dish tteokbokki — rice cakes in a variety of shapes and flavors, but noodles also available. These are combined with a choice of broths and sauces — including curry and carbonara —along with other throw-ins that run to lobster balls, sausage, and mushrooms to create a hot pot of unlimited renewability. A fun time for experimental eaters that starts at around $20 for lunch and $24 for dinner. Kids are half price.

A dining room with multi-colored lights and a few tables filled with people.
Witch Topokki in Flushing.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Churrascaria Plataforma

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Plataforma is a real Brazilian churrascaria, where meats are grilled then borne around the room by gaucho-clad servers. When you see something you like, stop them and they’ll slice freshly grilled meat onto your plate. At dinner meat choices include 13 varieties of beef, chicken, pork, and lamb, but you also get to visit a sprawling buffet of vegetable and salad sides in a Brazilian vein, and free dessert, too. It’s about $50 for lunch and $80 for dinner, with just salad options that are cheaper.

A gleaming knife about to cut beef tenderloins on a spit.
The rodizio allows you to eat unlimited amounts of barbecued meat.
Churrascaria Plataforma

Located in the heart of Theater District, Becco is an Italian restaurant helmed by Lidia Bastianich that offers at lunch and dinner a meal known as Sinfonia de Paste. In addition to an antipasti plate or Caesar salad, it offers unlimited portions of three pastas per day for $34.95.

A close up of fettucine.
Becco offers unlimited servings of three pastas.
Becco

Wonder Pig K-BBQ

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This wonderfully named spot in the shadow of the 7 train looks like a construction site inside, with concrete floors, high ceilings, and exhaust pipes rising skyward. One all-in price gets you all-you-can-eat meat from over two dozen choices (our favorites: beef brisket and pork bulgogi), plus all sorts of soups, porridges, and side dishes, plus the banchan — request a refill when original servings of kimchi and others run out. It’s $28 for lunch and $38 for dinner.

A sausage, heap of shaved brisket, and red-sauced pork on a concave griddle.
The view from the barbecue hot seat.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Kikoo Sushi

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East Villager Kikoo offers sushi and sashimi in all-you-can-eat portions, the former including hand rolls and all sorts of fanciful cut-up maki rolls. Tempura is another specialty and it poses the question, how many fried shrimp can you eat? . Just dinner for a two-hour window is $60 while dinner and drinks is $70, though sometimes the restaurants run promos and it’s less.

Three hand rolls in a wooden holder.
Unlimited hand rolls are part of the deal...
Kikoo Sushi

Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai B.B.Q.

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This all-you-can-eat Thai barbecue and hot pot destination offers an endless spread of vegetables, noodles, and meats like cilantro-marinated squid and chile-seasoned pork belly. Don’t know how to cook them? No worries, says co-owner Raweewan Chen. Employees are on deck with tips, as well as constant refills of chicken bone broth for the hotpot and new pans to grill on. Make room for hot snacks like creamy tom yum soup and pad krapow gai, in addition to desserts like grass jelly and jackfruit over shaved ice and mango sticky rice. It’s about $40 per person with a 90-minute limit.

A big cavernous space with boxy booths that have grills at the center.
Inside Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai BBQ.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

99 Favor Taste

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This grand two-level space dramatically lit like a Broadway theater offers all-you-can-eat barbecue, hot pot, or a combination of the two. For hot pot, you can choose three of eight bubbling broths — some spicy, some herbal — and a wide selection of vegetables, meats, tofus, noodles, fish balls, sausages, and dumplings. The meat selection for the barbecue is huge. AYCE options run between about $30 to $40.

A dramatic space in red and black with deep shadows.
The original bilevel 99 Favor Taste on Grand Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rakuzen AYCE Sushi

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This surprisingly glitzy spot in Sunset Park pulls out all the stops when it comes to sushi, with 23 varieties of nigiri and 72 types of maki rolls available. There’s also an Elmhurst location. Prices range from $30 to $36, depending on whether you’re choosing from the sashimi options.

A maki roll covered with sauce and another plate of nigiri sushi on a bright blue plate.
Rakuzen offers a vast range of nigiri and maki rolls.
Rakuzen

Lakruwana Restaurant

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Most South Asian restaurants no longer offer all-you-can-eat lunchtime deals, but Staten Islander Lakruwana is a holdout. The buffet, deposited in a series of ceramic and wooden pots that snake around the walls of the space, includes at least 20 dishes, breads, and condiments. It’s $20.99 for lunch and dinner.

Pots along a shelf with green, yellow, and reddish brown dishes on it.
A few of the offerings at the Lakruwana weekend buffet.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Crab House Brooklyn

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Though this place in Coney Island, right across the street from Luna Park, bills itself as a seafood buffet, that buffet is a virtual, contactless one. As you request dishes, they are brought fresh to the table, which makes a very long sequential meal possible. You might start with spicy shrimp, then move on to raw clams (a Coney Island favorite), blue crabs with Cajun butter sauce, fried sea bass, and finally mussels in black bean sauce. The seafood buffet is $80 and the lobster buffet is $115, with kids $15 to $30 dollars depending on age and which buffet.

Noodles with vegetables and shrimp on a rectangular black plate.
Garlic noodles and shrimp is one of the two dozen dishes the seafood buffet offers.
Crab House Brooklyn

The Meat Bros

The Meat Bros is like a modern factory of Korean barbecue that costs $39.99 for two hours. Their purpose is to get you to barbecue at your table as much meat as possible. Meats are requisitioned on a form with 25 varieties, including marinated pork collar and small spicy octopus. And banchan are included in one all-in price.

A rooms filled with tables with vents hanging down over each table.
The futuristic interior of Meat Bros.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet

Located in the Grand Concourse neighborhood, Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet really means “supreme” — the buffet runs to sushi, steak, seafood simply cooked, and Chinese food, a beguiling combination if there ever were one. Prices are $12 for lunch to $18 for dinner and cheaper options for kids under $12.

Several pieces of nigiri sushi featuring shrimp, salmon, and tuna.
Sushi is part of the buffet experience at Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet.
Hibachi Grill and Supreme Buffet

Witch Topokki

This all-you-can-eat in Flushing, Queens, specializes in the Korean dish tteokbokki — rice cakes in a variety of shapes and flavors, but noodles also available. These are combined with a choice of broths and sauces — including curry and carbonara —along with other throw-ins that run to lobster balls, sausage, and mushrooms to create a hot pot of unlimited renewability. A fun time for experimental eaters that starts at around $20 for lunch and $24 for dinner. Kids are half price.

A dining room with multi-colored lights and a few tables filled with people.
Witch Topokki in Flushing.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

Churrascaria Plataforma

Plataforma is a real Brazilian churrascaria, where meats are grilled then borne around the room by gaucho-clad servers. When you see something you like, stop them and they’ll slice freshly grilled meat onto your plate. At dinner meat choices include 13 varieties of beef, chicken, pork, and lamb, but you also get to visit a sprawling buffet of vegetable and salad sides in a Brazilian vein, and free dessert, too. It’s about $50 for lunch and $80 for dinner, with just salad options that are cheaper.

A gleaming knife about to cut beef tenderloins on a spit.
The rodizio allows you to eat unlimited amounts of barbecued meat.
Churrascaria Plataforma

Becco

Located in the heart of Theater District, Becco is an Italian restaurant helmed by Lidia Bastianich that offers at lunch and dinner a meal known as Sinfonia de Paste. In addition to an antipasti plate or Caesar salad, it offers unlimited portions of three pastas per day for $34.95.

A close up of fettucine.
Becco offers unlimited servings of three pastas.
Becco

Wonder Pig K-BBQ

This wonderfully named spot in the shadow of the 7 train looks like a construction site inside, with concrete floors, high ceilings, and exhaust pipes rising skyward. One all-in price gets you all-you-can-eat meat from over two dozen choices (our favorites: beef brisket and pork bulgogi), plus all sorts of soups, porridges, and side dishes, plus the banchan — request a refill when original servings of kimchi and others run out. It’s $28 for lunch and $38 for dinner.

A sausage, heap of shaved brisket, and red-sauced pork on a concave griddle.
The view from the barbecue hot seat.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Kikoo Sushi

East Villager Kikoo offers sushi and sashimi in all-you-can-eat portions, the former including hand rolls and all sorts of fanciful cut-up maki rolls. Tempura is another specialty and it poses the question, how many fried shrimp can you eat? . Just dinner for a two-hour window is $60 while dinner and drinks is $70, though sometimes the restaurants run promos and it’s less.

Three hand rolls in a wooden holder.
Unlimited hand rolls are part of the deal...
Kikoo Sushi

Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai B.B.Q.

This all-you-can-eat Thai barbecue and hot pot destination offers an endless spread of vegetables, noodles, and meats like cilantro-marinated squid and chile-seasoned pork belly. Don’t know how to cook them? No worries, says co-owner Raweewan Chen. Employees are on deck with tips, as well as constant refills of chicken bone broth for the hotpot and new pans to grill on. Make room for hot snacks like creamy tom yum soup and pad krapow gai, in addition to desserts like grass jelly and jackfruit over shaved ice and mango sticky rice. It’s about $40 per person with a 90-minute limit.

A big cavernous space with boxy booths that have grills at the center.
Inside Boon Dee Moo Ka Ta Thai BBQ.
Caroline Shin/Eater NY

99 Favor Taste

This grand two-level space dramatically lit like a Broadway theater offers all-you-can-eat barbecue, hot pot, or a combination of the two. For hot pot, you can choose three of eight bubbling broths — some spicy, some herbal — and a wide selection of vegetables, meats, tofus, noodles, fish balls, sausages, and dumplings. The meat selection for the barbecue is huge. AYCE options run between about $30 to $40.

A dramatic space in red and black with deep shadows.
The original bilevel 99 Favor Taste on Grand Street.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Rakuzen AYCE Sushi

This surprisingly glitzy spot in Sunset Park pulls out all the stops when it comes to sushi, with 23 varieties of nigiri and 72 types of maki rolls available. There’s also an Elmhurst location. Prices range from $30 to $36, depending on whether you’re choosing from the sashimi options.

A maki roll covered with sauce and another plate of nigiri sushi on a bright blue plate.
Rakuzen offers a vast range of nigiri and maki rolls.
Rakuzen

Lakruwana Restaurant

Most South Asian restaurants no longer offer all-you-can-eat lunchtime deals, but Staten Islander Lakruwana is a holdout. The buffet, deposited in a series of ceramic and wooden pots that snake around the walls of the space, includes at least 20 dishes, breads, and condiments. It’s $20.99 for lunch and dinner.

Pots along a shelf with green, yellow, and reddish brown dishes on it.
A few of the offerings at the Lakruwana weekend buffet.
Robert Sietsema/Eater NY

Crab House Brooklyn

Though this place in Coney Island, right across the street from Luna Park, bills itself as a seafood buffet, that buffet is a virtual, contactless one. As you request dishes, they are brought fresh to the table, which makes a very long sequential meal possible. You might start with spicy shrimp, then move on to raw clams (a Coney Island favorite), blue crabs with Cajun butter sauce, fried sea bass, and finally mussels in black bean sauce. The seafood buffet is $80 and the lobster buffet is $115, with kids $15 to $30 dollars depending on age and which buffet.

Noodles with vegetables and shrimp on a rectangular black plate.
Garlic noodles and shrimp is one of the two dozen dishes the seafood buffet offers.
Crab House Brooklyn

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