clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

A New Baja-Style Carne Asada Taco Shop Breezes Into Bushwick

New, 3 comments

Taqueria Al Pastor gives Los Tacos No. 1 a run for its money, says critic Robert Sietsema

A gray storefront has a colorful VW microbus taqueria painted on the outside.
A VW microbus taqueria graces the exterior of Taqueria Al Pastor

When it opened in 2013, the wildly popular Los Tacos No. 1 was a game changer where Mexican food was concerned. Unlike a classic taqueria, this place behaved like a pared-down Tijuana taco stand with only four fillings. Two of those fillings were insanely good, especially the pork adobada cut from a vertical spit and the grilled carne asada. The public loved the simplicity. Prep was done right behind the counter, the fillings were heaped generously, and the guac copious and free.

Who would be surprised to find that other restaurateurs might try to emulate this simple formula? A week ago, Taqueria Al Pastor appeared over the easternmost entrance to the DeKalb L train station in Bushwick, using the Pueblan name for the same rotating pork cylinder surmounted by sweetening and tenderizing pineapple twirling on a trompo that is the star of the show at Los Tacos No. 1. While Taqueria Al Pastor doesn’t look like a beachside taco stand, the layout is similarly bare bones. The influence seems so obvious that a rumor started spreading in the neighborhood that a former Los Tacos employee was helming it. Inside Taqueria Al Pastor, a central area features mainly standing room and minimal stool seating along a window, plus a counter in front of an open kitchen.

A woman seen from behind pulls masa from a metal bowl to make tortillas.
Tortillas are made fresh.
A man holds a tortilla, with a cylinder of pork al pastor in the background.
Making your al pastor taco to order

But staffers at the restaurant said the new spot comes from owner Pedro Ramales, who hails from Puebla and has operated more conventional taquerias in the neighborhood, including Taqueria Acatlan nearby on Irving Avenue. And the new spot has some elements in common with Tacombi, too; Taqueria Al Pastor’s façade features a VW minibus, much like the kind turned into mobile taquerias in the Yucatan Peninsula, which inspired the original Tacombi on Elizabeth Street.

The food, though, is in a league of its own so far. Step up to the counter and place your order. As at Tacos No. 1, you get a ticket and present it to a guy further down, who superintends your meal. Behind him, a different staffer pats a tortilla from a bowl of masa and cooks it on the griddle for your order — corn tortillas don’t get any fresher. The pork al pastor is freshly cut, too, by another staffer, who puts it into the tortilla and hands it back to the first guy, who adds cilantro, raw onions, guac, and a squirt of a surprisingly incendiary red salsa. The tacos here have an innate burn that those at Los Tacos lack.

A hand holds a pork taco so you can see what’s inside from the end.
Al pastor taco on a corn tortilla

Available as a taco or a two-tortilla gringa stuck together with melted cheese ($3.50, $4.50), the al pastor here is similar to that of Los Tacos. Get it on the gringa, wherein the moisture content is enhanced, and the taste is fantastic. The carne asada, however, is even better than that of Los Tacos. It has a hint of garlic and probably some other spices, too, making it supremely flavorful. Though Taqueria Al Pastor is only a week old, the carne asada is instantly one of the city’s best versions of that taco.

The restaurant also has volcanes, an item apparently native to Jalisco, Sinaloa, and Baja that’s similar to a tostada. The crisp edge is turned upward somewhat, keeping the fillings from tumbling off when you bite into it. The cactus filling I tried was wholesome and pleasantly slimy, tasting of the desert after a sudden rain. But it really can’t compete with the al pastor or carne asada, and I didn’t try the chicken when I saw skinless breasts cooking on the grill.

Burritos and platos with rice are also available, but I most highly recommend the flour tortilla gringa stuffed with the place’s powerful carne asada. 128 Wyckoff Ave, at Stanhope Street, Bushwick

A flour gringa, like a quesadilla with cheese and grilled beef inside.
Best order: Flour tortilla gringa with carne asada

Taqueria Al Pastor

128 Wyckoff Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11237 (718) 269-7538 Visit Website

Sign up for the newsletter Sign up for the Eater New York newsletter

The freshest news from the local food world