clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Nom Wah Tu Swings Open With Dim Sum For Dinner

The Lower East Side restaurant has duck fried rice and hot and sour mushrooms

Nom Wah Tu duck fried rice
Duck fried rice at Nom Wah Tu
Nom Wah Tu

The newest member of the Nom Wah family started serving dim sum for dinner on Sunday. Nom Wah Tu — chef Jonathan Wu and restaurateur Wilson Tang’s new restaurant in the former Fung Tu space — is now open with limited hours and a limited menu at 22 Orchard Street, between Hester Street and Canal Street.

The restaurant is the full-service, more modern sibling of the growing empire of Chinese restaurants launched off of Tang’s historic family restaurant Nom Wah Tea Parlor. The space housed Wu and Tang’s critically acclaimed modern Chinese-American restaurant Fung Tu for more than three years, and the team decided to flip it earlier this summer.

Here, small plates, labeled as dim sum, cost $5 to $7, and another section of “chef’s specials” cost under $15. Currently, the menu includes dishes like hot and sour mushrooms with mala vinagriette, roti pancakes with vegetable curry, duck wings, and duck fried rice with Brussels sprouts, oyster mushrooms, and pickled beets. Dumpling dishes include a shrimp and snow pea leaf dumplings with blood orange-kefir lime oil and a pan-fried chicken dumpling with cumin-chili oil and a yogurt-dill sauce.

Drinks range from beers and natural wines to cocktails with some Chinese ingredients, such as a a Mr. Yee with dark rum, Chinese Vermouth, and orange.

Tang has been on an expansion kick for the Nom Wah restaurants. Besides the original dim sum restaurant in Chinatown, he also has a counter-service restaurants Nom Wah Nolita, Nom Wah Kuai, and a planned Nom Wah in Essex Crossing’s Market Line.

Nom Wah Tu is closed Monday night and then will be keeping dinner hours for the rest of the week. The team has not yet decided when to expand hours and the menu, but stay tuned.

We're open from 6-10 tonight. Friends, family, neighbors, come on by! #tusexy

A post shared by Nom Wah Tu (@nomwahtu) on

Sign up for the newsletter Sign up for the Eater New York newsletter

The freshest news from the local food world