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Is Take Root South Brooklyn's Priciest Restaurant?

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Take Root, a vegetable-focused tasting menu spot in a former Carroll Gardens yoga studio, might soon rank as South Brooklyn's most expensive restaurant.

Chef Elise Kornack, an Eater Young Guns semi-finalist, will raise the price of dinner by $20 to $105 after July 1. By comparison, the next most expensive tasting menus in that section of Kings County are at Dover ($95), Battersby ($95), and the Grocery ($85).

"The tasting is worth $105," Kornack tells Eater. "We have been planning the price change for a few months now, as we want to be able to give our guests a fuller experience. This includes sourcing more expensive ingredients and increasing the number of wines we offer, plus additional restaurant costs. We will add a few 'bells and whistles' to both the menu and service​, ​but ​it will simply be an enhancement of the Take Root experience that is already in place and working."

After the $20 hike, the 10-course dinner for two, after tax and 20 percent tip, will cost $271, up from $219. And while that's more expensive that virtually any good restaurant south of Atlantic Avenue, Take Root is still OODLES cheaper than Brooklyn's priciest venues: The Little Elm in Williamsburg ($135), Blanca in Bushwick ($195), and The Chef's Table at Brooklyn Fare in Downtown Brooklyn ($255). Even the full wine pairing at The Chef's Table ($150) is more expensive than the food menu at Take Root!

Take Root is open on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, and offers one seating per night at 8 p.m. Kornack and her wife, Anna Hieronimus, are the owners and sole employees. There is no set wine pairing; pours by the glass range from $10 for sparkling wine (Gruet) to $18 for a California Cabernet (Hendry).

How much will you personally spend at Take Root or other expensive Brooklyn restaurants? Check out our interactive graph below! (Mobile users: Click here).


· All Eater Coverage of Take Root [~ENY~]

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