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Boat Bar Says No Thanks To Customer's Dimes

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Eater columnist Brooks of Sheffield took a friend's recommendation and stopped in to Boat Bar on Smith Street in Boerum Hill on his way home. It was early in the evening and the bar was empty at the time except for the one bartender, and Brooks arrived with bags of groceries, a dollar bill or two, and a pocket full of change. Confident that he had enough money for a $3 draft and an ability to save preciously needed quarters for laundry, Brooks ordered a beer, laid a dollar on the bar, and started to count out dimes.

The bartender told Brooks that the bar doesn't accept dimes as payment because the owner thinks that our smallest coin "clogs up the register" and pointed Brooks to an ATM across the street. But the fees charged by the ATM would have turned that $3 beer into a $6 beer, and besides, dimes are US currency and should be accepted as payment for a drink. As Brooks explains:

I don't pay for beers with coins often. But I have on occasion. It's a good way to get rid of change. And every bartender I've paid in silver has been grateful for the exchange. Cash registers are perpetually low on change. They thank me for the coins. But that's all beside the point. If you run a business or bar or restaurant, whatever your customer has in his pocket when he enters is gold to you. Gold. I don't care what form the money takes. It's cash your patron wants to spend on your establishment and you accept it readily, happy and respectfully. The only time the expression "You money is no good here" makes business sense is if it means the drinks are on the house.
It seems that Brooks paid with the quarters that were meant for laundry, and even had enough kindness to leave the bartender a tip. A shiny dime.
· Boat Bar Sez "Buddy, We Don't Want Your Dime" [Lost City]
· Who Goes There? [~ENY~]

Boat Bar

175 Smith St, Brooklyn, NY

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