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Good News/ Bad News: Stumptown Coffee

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WholeDi: Over the past year or so, Portland's Stumptown Coffee has slowly begun to conquer the New York coffee scene. First by being the supplier of choice for cafes like Ninth Street Espresso and eventually showing up in restaurants such as Frankie's Spuntino, Freemans and the Momofukus. After riding a wave of hype generated by its cult-like ex-pat fan base and media friendly owner/shaman Duane Sorrenson, Stumptown opened its first proper NYC shop on the first floor of the Ace Hotel on Labor Day. On to the good, the okay and the bordering on worship:

The Amazing News: One yelper familiar with the Original Portland location of Stumptown says that the coffee at the New York shop is not only brewed like it is back on the West Coast, but it is actually brewed by the very same baristas who have now been moved to New York: "...the Stumptown at the Ace here on 29th and Broadway is JUST like back at home. They even brought in some of the PDX baristas. So what I'm saying is, the same sexypants with the floor plans for tattoos that used to make me my amazing latte back in PDX, just now poured me an amazing latte. Right here, in my own neighborhood. This seals the deal, I'm never moving back to the west coast. Now that Stumptown's here, I have no reason to." [Yelp]

The Okay News: After three visits, this yelper finds the service inconsistent, and the coffee generally very good: "First visit, okay service (they seemed a little unsure of everyones job) the coffee ( a cappucino) drinkable,barely. Second visit I stood there for about 7 minutes before anyone acknowledged me, there were only 2 of us in line...this time an espresso, wonderful..the 3rd time,,. horrrible attitude, great coffee..so my conclusion is this..if they are very professional and nice to you, walk away, if service is bad, stay.." [Yelp]

The Fantastic News: Oliver Strand gets on the blog to pen a rave for the coffee mecca: "This kind of tasteful austerity works when the coffee is this good. A macchiato ($2.80) was exceptional if on the large side, a shot of Hair Bender espresso topped by a thick froth of steamed milk. A cappuccino ($3.30) was 10 cents cheaper than at my local Starbucks, a difference that could become significant for frequent caffeinators. [T]his could be a game-changer. The Manhattan Stumptown is more polished than anything on the West Coast, including the other Stumptowns. And the style is distinctly its own – it isn’t evoking Milan or Marseilles. It feels like New York." [DinersJournal]

The Yummy but Pretentious News: HotelChatter, admittedly not experts, files their opinion: "...we aren't exactly coffee experts; we're hotel experts, but we tried an Americano and a Cappucino for the hell of it and can report that they are pretty tasty. Although we weren't lectured on the heritage of the beans as we had expected, the cafe does have an appropriate level of pretension. We wouldn't make it an outing again, but we would swing by if we happened to be in the area (which isn't often, it's not much of a destination neighborhood)." [HC]

The Good News: An Eater reader thinks it's a great addition to the nabe, leaving some positive feedback in the comments: "Went by this afternoon for a macchiato. Though I was skeptical, the staff were surprisingly friendly and the coffee was exceptional. Great addition to NYC coffee scene, esp. in such a dry nabe." [EaterComments]

The Twitter Roundup News: From a tidal wave of tweets: @kerrynewberry writes "it's fabulous coffee, my absolute favorite; stumptown in nyc, love it!," @seadevi thinks there's a door policy, "The uniform for sitting in Stumptown: deep V-neck T shirt. Wasn't wearing one, so forced to get takeout," and @notfortourists deems the coffee perfect, "Absolutely perfect cappuccino served by hipster baristas at Stumptown in Ace Hotel @ 29&Broadway. Thank u Portland." [Twitter]

Stumptown Coffee Roasters

212b Pacific Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (347) 416-6741 Visit Website

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